Disaster Obstetrics and Gynecology

TOP > Organization > Disaster Medical Science Division > Disaster Obstetrics and Gynecology

Professor: Kiyoshi ITO
Lecturer: Yasuhiro MIKI
Assistant Professor: Masatoshi SAITO (Concurrent)

The objectives of this field are to establish international standards for disaster countermeasures by analyzing the impacts of a disaster on mothers and children, and to perform a long-term study of the effects of disasters on obstetrics and gynecology-specific diseases.

  1. Delivery cases will occur even in the hyperacute and acute phases of a disaster. This situation requires establishment of a perinatal medical system in a disaster and international standards for countermeasures.
  2. Severe stress in a pregnant woman will affect both the woman and her baby. Clarification of the kind of stress placed on pregnant women in the Great East Japan Earthquake, and the resulting diseases, will allow establishment of a perinatal medical system to predict and prevent perinatal diseases caused by a disaster, and to protect the health of pregnant women and newborns.
  3. Miyagi Prefecture is thought of as the birthplace of cancer examination, and the consultation rate for cervical cancer screening in this prefecture is the highest in Japan. The Great East Japan Earthquake devastated the healthcare system in coastal areas and reestablishment of this system is important for maintaining the long-term health of disaster victims. In addition, information management for patients based on the assumption of a disaster will have a synergistic effect with a patient intelligence sharing system, such as a cloud system. A network system should be established from these standpoints.
  4. The great disaster and subsequent chronic stress caused by living in evacuation centers and temporary housing, and severe changes in living environment including diet may have affected the endocrine system of women and related development of gynecological diseases. There is a need to clarify the characteristics of gynecological diseases caused by a major disaster and subsequent chronic changes in the living environment, with the goal of establishing preventive measures.